10/21/14

Posted: 00:32:52

10/20/14

This morning we had some action on the tuna while looking for yellows around a couple of shallows. With limited success finding the grade of yellows we were after, we started looking elsewhere. After a few hours of looking we threw in the towel and traveled for the afternoon with just a couple dorado strikes for our efforts. We will be in a different area tomorrow focused on some variety for the day.

Brian

10/19/14

Posted: 23:36:10

10/19/14


Very good tuna fishing this morning turned into a slow scratch by late morning. We took the opportunity to do a little prospecting and located an area holding bait and some dorado. First time Royal Star angler Anthony foster gets the honors today with a 22# yellowfin.

Brian


Photo Here...

10/18/14

Posted: 23:41:10

10/18/14

This morning started off a little on the slow side. After some searching in a new area, we found what we were looking for, tuna biting everything in the water. The fish were all mixed up as far as size goes from release models to 30 pounds. We spent the afternoon engaged in cast and swing style fishing. At dinner our weary anglers were happily recounting stories of the day's battles.

Pictorial honors today go to Captain Willy Cloyes and his wahoo. Caught while we were in search mode.

Brian


Photo Here...

10/18/14

Posted: 00:21:28

10/17/14


We started our day fishing for tuna. After scratching up a couple a rod, it became clear that this was not going to get the job done and we pointed for greener pastures. We looked throughout the afternoon for just a couple of wahoo strikes. So with a nice warm up under our belts, and a few fish resting in the RSW tank we will be looking for more sustainable action tomorrow.

Royal Star regular Paul Kelleher put in his time at the stern and was rewarded with this tasty speedster.

Brian


Photo Here...

10/16/14

Posted: 23:58:47

10/16/14

This is truly a different year judging by water conditions. Warm water has moved fish to unexpected locations and left other areas devoid of life. Today we stopped in the afternoon, to wet some lines and break up the ride down. We were pleasantly surprised by what we found. 18 – 25 # tuna responded to our offerings, and we scratched at them until dark.
Ron Rymer got off to a quick start this afternoon, landing a hand full of yellowfin like this one.

Brian


Photo Here...

10/16/14

Posted: 00:28:29

10/15/14

After a rare night at the dock, we departed on The Tiburon Engineering 10 day adventure. We got off to an early start and have a nice load of bait on board. We spent the day engaged in rigging and relaxing as we make our way south towards good fishing prospects. Our weather is good and this group of experienced anglers is ready for whatever we may find.

Brian

10/14/14

Posted: 00:20:55

10/13/14

Precisely the ending note we sought. Consistent with non-stop reports of widespread offshore glory during the past week our day began in grease calm weather far below the advertised zone. Even there it didn't take long. From the reports coming in over the wire it didn't take long anywhere. Everyone, everywhere – over one hundred miles of offshore waters, loaded up on big, beautiful dorado. A few “skin” were observed around just about every floating kelp and a handful were landed; nice ones too, average size of 40 – 50#'s.

These conditions and results at this time of year would be consistent with the zone below and outside the ridge, only in this case they were not. From less than 100 miles south of San Diego to at least 200 miles south water temperatures are in the 74 – 77 degree Fahrenheit range and loaded with tropical apex pelagic game fish; I didn't even mention the incredible sign of school size yellowfin tuna and numerous gaggles of striped marlin we saw. This is an incredible year, one that we will be talking about, fondly, for the remainder of our lives. It is that good, right now.

Arrival tomorrow will be followed by a night ashore restoring our big girl to tip top working order and allowing the boys a quick breather before heading out on our next ten day Wednesday morning. This one is soon to be in the books. An interesting, diverse ten day to say the least. In reflection one can only marvel at the variety of conditions, fishing, species, and scenery this voyage featured. It is safe to say that more diversity would be difficult to achieve. From grease calm seas, to sitting out a day of real weather in the protection of an island, to fishing for yellowtail above and wahoo down below we just about covered the entire spectrum of possibilities; exactly what fall ten day voyages are known for, and why anglers choose these adventures.

For the big three – quality, sufficient quantity, and variety, this voyage scores near perfect; a few larger tuna were the only missing components that would have propelled this run into the stratosphere were they found. Where this voyage does achieve a perfect score is fine company and camaraderie; fantastic individuals and anglers sharing time at sea in the spirit of good times. Always a great time with plenty of laughs and memorable adventure the annual North County Firefighter sponsored run, headed up by long time Royal Star friend and Charter Master Tim Marshall, adhered to tradition this voyage and then some.

To all our gratitude is extended as this voyage comes to an end. Photos today feature Royal Star veteran anglers Mark Mayeda with a fine example of the average dorado found this morning and Gene Hendrickson, eighty one years young, still showing his boys how it is done with this fine Alijos Rocks wahoo.

A final reminder also about the three day voyages coming up at the end of the month. I once again offer the opinion and sense that these voyages are lined up for success both offshore and along the beach as well as I ever recall. Saturday, October 25 – Tuesday October 28th, and Friday October 31st – Monday November 3rd are the dates. I'll be following the offshore happenings close during the upcoming week. If you're riding the fence, or need some convincing, feel free to give me a call in the office. Captain Brian “Gerbie” Sims takes the helm on the next ten day run sponsored by Tiburon products and Charter Master Bob Stenbro.

Tim Ekstrom

Photo Here...
Photo Here...


10/13/14

Posted: 00:45:58

10/12/14

A change of pace today well received; latitude gained and stress free angling for the coveted kelp bass and a few trophy mossbacks. Good times, beautiful scenery, flat calm conditions – a stark contrast that restores the sweet love but doesn't fool anyone. A mean, fiery soul underpins this grace, one never to be underestimated, or forgotten.

But that knowledge was set aside as we toured and absorbed the beauty of Isla Cedros in the late afternoon. The soaking rains that accompanied last weeks demon Simon had a profound impact on the countenance of this island. All along the lee side water was still seeping and pouring from various arroyos and sheds.

The final evening stop, that produced a few big ole' yellas' and numerous sturdy bass, featured a sight to behold. Just inside our anchorage of choice flowed a 150 foot cascading waterfall profoundly audible while twilight passed into darkness. What a treat! In thirty years of visiting this island and fishing the area extensively I have never been party to such a spectacle. The visual and audible were more akin to Alaska or Panama than Isla Cedros. Three days after the rain stopped and water still pouring from the heights; very cool. Open eyes receive extraordinary favor.

Tomorrow's final push will be above and offshore in primo conditions. In search of a few dorado and perhaps even a couple more wahoo an ideal ending note of perfect weather and offshore exotics is certainly within reason. We'll be hard at it to ensure that it happens. Photos today feature a couple of wahoo from the day prior and one image grabbed from our late anchorage yesterday.

Royal Star veterans Mario Guerra and Don Ballanti share the day's wahoo honors, and Chris Hendrickson gets the nod with a 39.8#, surface iron enticed Cedros yellowtail. To Chris' left is the above mentioned waterfall. Another long range first. It never get's old.

Tim Ekstrom

Photo Here...
Photo Here...
Photo Here...


10/12/14

Posted: 09:02:02

10/11/14

Working back north in the throes of ecstasy, and agony. The passions of a successful day of long range wahoo fishing are extreme. It is the apex of a fall ten day run. This is what anglers come for; the chance to see, to live the fishing experience of long range legend. Not just a random jig strike or picking an odd one or two at a time, schools of the big speedsters; packs and gaggles marauding within legendary long range zones.

We lived it today. A handful of opportunities that intimately familiarized those novice to this style of fishing, and reminded the veterans, that wahoo action is simultaneously the most thrilling, exciting, gratifying, frustrating, and agonizingly disappointing form of fishing that we know. Even when everything is done correctly - perfect rigging, gear selection, and execution, the odds still favor the fish somewhere in the neighborhood of two to one.

Of course there is always the angler or two on a roll beating the odds having the best day of his/her life. Those few fortunate's just add to the immeasurable dismay of the unfortunate one or two on the opposite side of the equation living the grueling wahoo curse; part of the fishing curve we all must begrudgingly endure. Poise, grace, and patience I always say; admittedly much easier said than done when it comes to wahoo fishing. Checking frustration with smiles is the only effective formula that pays dividends whether the day ends with a win or a loss.

In today's case the win column was near chock full, with multiple multiples to boot. It was the signature wahoo opportunity. The wily bastards skulked around for quite awhile before deciding to get with the program (a dastardly tactic so effective in coaxing anglers to drop their guard) then turned on for a few hours to deliver a trademark performance. One lazy jig strike turned into another one hooked on a bomb, then another on a jig, then ten more eating everything trailing through the water. Instant pandemonium, chaos. Not really because we (the deck crew and I) have seen this rodeo plenty of times before, but the instant shock of recognition, realization that the moment really is here, temporarily throws almost everyone off for a few minutes, every time.

Suffice it to say that we got our rear ends handed to us the first go around – about twenty five chances for four landed, ouch!, but we got in the saddle afterward hitting them right where it counts, for the most part. In the end I'd have to say that the day ended in a draw, that first bad run cost us the upper hand, but we departed duly satisfied with almost two around tucked away safely in the premium, RSW, hatch. I'm still grieving for a couple three anglers that received an invitation to the party but couldn't make it happen, but take solace in the knowledge that that escaped dream will spurn them on. Such is the attraction of fishing, to fishermen.

Photos today feature a couple of winners mighty pleased with their prize. Long time Royal Star veteran and favorite Steve Masuda ironically nailed this nice “skinny” on gear, following my recommendation, intended for yellowtail. This opportunist grabbed the trusty old yo-yo lure on the way down. First time Royal Star angler Rocky Vasi lived the dream today. Wahoo, Alijos Rocks, the legend was larger than life for Rocky whose first visit to this zone was thirty years ago! Between this dandy and another, and a few more that craftily evaded capture, Rocky was pinching himself by this day's end. Long range fishing at it's finest. I'm glad to be along for the ride.

Tim Ekstrom


Photo Here...
Photo Here...



10/11/14

Posted: 00:47:11

10/10/14

The highlight ticker reads as follows: we had some fun, got it done, then sailed off into the sun; that's how it was. School fish again, with a few standout dorado and yellowtail, were the morning quarry that interestingly, frustratingly, proved reluctant to get with the program. One had to coax and prod, and sift through a dedicated army of watermelon sized skipjack, in order to realize success in the form of a quality tuna or worthy exotic; classic ridge fishing. Aside from the rare occasion when the fishing is “clean”, or less the multitudes of voracious everything's that inhabit these banks, this is standard down here.

But now headed west we are liberated from the quantity part of the equation seeking pure quality and variety for the remainder of the voyage. Whether we achieve the goal remains to be seen, but the goal is clear. We have a bunch of fish in the hatch, plenty to satisfy, now the focus accordingly adjusts. And thankfully the effort will be executed in fine working conditions according to weather forecasts. Another blissful stretch of flat calm begins tomorrow and follows through at least the middle of next week. Ah, back to the way we all prefer; perhaps reimbursement for the universal grief Simon broadcast earlier this run.

On a closing note I again want to remind one and all about the upcoming three day “mini” Royal Star long range adventures we added to the schedule at the end of this month. I am hearing of and seeing some pretty incredible happenings on the local grounds and also in zones well within three day range down below. Water temperatures in the 73 – 76 degree Fahrenheit range, continuing strong north westerly current, huge amounts of 15 – 35# dorado, wahoo still being seen and landed both on kelps and offshore now as close as thirty miles from San Diego; this all happened yesterday! I even heard of a wahoo hooked and nearly landed at the Coronado Islands! This warm water cycle, and everything in the way of fishing that comes with it, is no joke, and promises to hold well beyond this month into November, maybe longer.

If you have the time these three day runs Saturday October 25th – Tuesday October 28th, and Friday October 31st – Monday November 3 are a grand opportunity to join a Royal Star voyage and see what we are about. In addition to the incredible fishing prospects (I didn't even mention the hoards of yellowtail all along the coast) anglers on these voyages will be treated to the Royal Star red carpet standard of service, fish handling, fishing instruction, and of course cuisine. Chef's Drew Rivera and Jeffrey Grant will be here to amaze and satisfy with their extraordinary culinary talents. With what I am seeing at present on the offshore grounds I can not encourage everyone strongly enough to make good on this opportunity. Give Tracy or Brian a call in the office or I will be happy to answer any questions upon return from this voyage next week. We look forward to hearing from you!

Photo today features Royal Star angler Mike Vasile who nabbed this beefy, 30# class yellowtail at the crack of dawn amidst steady action on yellowfin tuna; a job well done!

Tim Ekstrom

Photo Here...


 
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